Intimate Chopin and Liszt from Ádám György

Ádám György, piano
Rheinberger Chamber Hall
Severance Hall
Cleveland, OH
October 16, 2017

György: Improvisations on Hungarian folk songs, themes by Ádám György, and themes by Keith Jarrett
Chopin: Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48 No. 1
Chopin: Mazurka in C sharp minor, Op. 6 No. 2
Chopin: Mazurka in A minor, Op. 17 No. 4
Liszt: Rigoletto Paraphrase, S434
Liszt: La campanella, No. 3 from Grandes études de Paganini, S141
Liszt: St. François de Paule marchant sur les flots, No. 2 from Deux légendes, S175
Chopin: Scherzo No. 2 in B flat minor, Op. 31

Encore:
Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 in C sharp minor, S244/2

After seeing pianist Ádám György give a memorable performance of Liszt’s Piano Sonata in B minor at the 2017 American Liszt Society Festival this past spring, I have been eager to hear him in a full length recital. The opportunity for just that came Monday evening when the pianist stopped in Cleveland as part of a brief US recital tour, culminating in a Carnegie Hall performance this Sunday – which, by no coincidence, falls on Liszt’s birthday. The venue of choice was the intimate Rheinberger Chamber Hall at Severance Hall, an ideal setting for recitals and chamber music.

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Ádám György, photo credit adamgyorgy.com

Introduced as a “diplomat for Hungarian culture abroad”, György boldly opened the program with one of his own compositions, a 20 minute set of improvisations on source material as disparate as Hungarian folk songs, themes by Keith Jarrett, and themes by the pianist himself. It began almost impressionistically, unfolding at a glacial pace and contrasting the extreme ends of the piano’s registers. The work favored a rhapsodic ebb and flow over a taut structural cohesion; while it may have consequently meandered at times, the juxtapositions of modal folk music and the jazz-inflected Jarrett melodies were given with a remarkable fluidity.

Chopin’s Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48 No. 1 followed attacca, offered as something of a pendant to the improvisations. Though perhaps a jarring interpretative choice, György’s reading of the nocturne left little to be desired. An ineffable melancholy characterized the primary theme which led to a stately chordal procession, and the concluding agitato section bordered on the ecstatic. Eschewing the standard concert practice of punctuating selections with stage exits, György remained at the keyboard for the duration, presenting the program in an unbroken arc. A pair of Chopin’s mazurkas followed, both contrasting wistfulness with a folksy charm and rhythmic snap.

Liszt’s Rigoletto Paraphrase is based on the famous quartet from the namesake Verdi opera, and under György’s hands the theme was presented with a delicate elegance, increasingly complex and ornamented. While one would have preferred a bit more clarity in some of the octave leaps and rapid scalar runs, the cascading octaves that concluded showed György’s virtuosity at its finest. La campanella was a tour de force of pianistic acrobatics, the repeated notes high in the treble sounding as bell-like as the title suggests. György sailed through the fearsome trills with apparent ease, and the work built to a thunderous coda. The final Liszt selection on the printed program was the second of the two Légendes, namely St. François de Paule marchant sur les flots. A work of deep religious introspection, the rocking waves depicted in the bass made this imposing piece the evening’s emotional climax.

György turned attention back to Chopin one final time in the Scherzo No. 2 in B flat minor, and this commanding performance was filled with passion and drama. The modest but enthusiastic audience was indulged with a substantial encore, Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 in C sharp minor, to end the evening on a quintessentially Hungarian note and in a blaze of pianistic brilliance.

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